Peter Riley Bahr

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University: 
University of Michigan - Ann Arbor
Unit: 
Education
Department: 
Center for the Study of Higher and Postsecondary Education
Title: 
Associate Professor
Short bio: 

Peter Riley Bahr joined the faculty of the Center for the Study of Higher and Postsecondary Education at the University of Michigan in the fall of 2009. He received his PhD in Sociology from the University of California-Davis.

Research summary: 

In his research, Bahr seeks to deconstruct students' pathways into, through, and out of community colleges and into the workforce or on to four-year postsecondary institutions.  His recent work is focused particularly on students' course-taking and enrollment patterns in the community college and their subsequent labor market outcomes, such as employment and earnings, as well as the impact of students' varied patterns of course-taking and enrollment on the assessment of community college performance.

Recent publications: 

Bahr, P. R., McNaughtan, J., Jackson, G., Gross, J., & Oster, M. (2015). An empirical account of community college STEM pathways. Ann Arbor, Michigan: Center for the Study of Higher and Postsecondary Education, School of Education, University of Michigan.

Bahr, P. R., Dynarski, S., Jacob, B., Kreisman, D., Sosa, A., & Wiederspan, M. (2015). Labor market returns to community college awards: Evidence from Michigan. New York, New York: Center for the Analysis of Postsecondary Education and Employment, Teachers College, Columbia University.

Bahr, P. R., Gross, J. L., Slay, K. E., & Christensen, R. D. (2015). First in line: Student registration priority in community colleges. Educational Policy29, 342-374.

Bahr, P. R. (2014). The labor market return in earnings to community college credits and credentials in California. Ann Arbor, Michigan: Center for the Study of Higher and Postsecondary Education, School of Education, University of Michigan.

Bahr, P. R. (2013). Classifying community colleges based on students’ patterns of use. Research in Higher Education54, 433-460.